Genealogy Data Page 16 (Notes Pages)


Maynadier, Daniel (b. , d. 1745)

Note: The Reverend Daniel Maynadier was the rector of St. Peter's Parish, Talbot County, Maryland.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Papenfuse
Title: Edward C. Papenfuse, et al, A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland L
egislature, 1635-1789 (Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985)
egislature, 1635-1789
egislature, 1635-1789. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985.
Given Name: Daniel
Death: 1745
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Murray, William (b. 1692, d. 1763)
Note: Dr. William Murray was born in Scotland in Tullibardine Castle, the seat of the Dukes of Atholl, whose family name is Murray. But the exact relationship has not yet been established. Given the history of the devlopment of surnames in Scotland, it is entirely possible, even probable, that his relationship to the Dukes of Atholl was not close.

He emigrated to Maryland about 1716, where he practiced medicine "without previous study of the profession." Regardless, he did well enough to see his children well established in the highest reaches of Maryland society.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Papenfuse
Title: Edward C. Papenfuse, et al, A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland L
egislature, 1635-1789 (Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985)
egislature, 1635-1789
egislature, 1635-1789. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985.
Given Name: William
Death: 1763
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Ennalls, Sarah (b. 14 SEP 1697, d. 19 NOV 1742)
Given Name: Sarah
Death: 19 NOV 1742
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Sim, Patrick (b. , d. 24 OCT 1740)
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Maryland Genealogies
Title: Maryland genealogies: A Consolidation of Articles from the Maryland His
torical Magazine (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1
980)
torical Magazine
torical Magazine. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1
980.
Page: "The Brooke Family," pp. 91-102.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Papenfuse
Title: Edward C. Papenfuse, et al, A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland L
egislature, 1635-1789 (Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985)
egislature, 1635-1789
egislature, 1635-1789. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985.
Given Name: Patrick
Death: 24 OCT 1740
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Brooke, Mary (b. )
Given Name: Mary
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Murdock, William (b. ABT 1700, d. 17 OCT 1769)
Note: William Murdock was a major landowner in Prince George's and Frederick counties, According to a "debt-book" for Prince George's County in 1753 he owned 2662 acres in that county alone. At the end of his life he held 5,263 acres in Prince George's and Frederick Counties. As a man of considerable wealth, he left his wife, along with a life interest in two plantations, "my new chaise and two chaise horses, cart, draught horses, English blooded mares to value of 100 pounds." He also left his children well provided for.

He was High Sheriff of Prince George's County in 1740 and served as a Burgess for that County from 1749 until 1769, the year of his death. In 1756 he was appointed Commissioner to disburse the state fund for protection against hostile Indians as well as the state fund for the expedition against Fort Duquesne.

He served as a member of the House of Delegates in 1765-66. He represented Maryland in the Stamp Act Congress that met in New York in 1765. He was on the commission to draw up and report a vote of thanks to those members of the British Parliament who defended the rights of the colonists. In 1768 he was appointed to a commission to draft a petition to the King, remonstrating against the imposition of taxes on imported articles.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Maryland Genealogies
Title: Maryland genealogies: A Consolidation of Articles from the Maryland His
torical Magazine (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1
980)
torical Magazine
torical Magazine. Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1
980.
Data:
Text: "The Murdock Family of Maryland and Virginia," by William B. Marye, pp. 239-247
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Bowie
Title: Effie Gywnn Bowie, Across the years in St. George's County
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Papenfuse
Title: Edward C. Papenfuse, et al, A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland L
egislature, 1635-1789 (Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985)
egislature, 1635-1789
egislature, 1635-1789. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985.
Given Name: William
Death: 17 OCT 1769 Queen Anne's, Prince George's County
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Addison, Anne (b. 18 FEB 1711, d. 25 OCT 1755)
Note: The November 1st, 1775, issue of the Maryland Gazette carried the news that "On Thursday last, Oct. 25, died in Prince George's County, Mrs. Ann Murdock, virtuous consort of Mr. William Murdock and daughter of the late Col. Thomas Addison. She was a gentlewoman possessed of many virtues and diligent in the performance of every duty incumbent upon a wife, mother and neighbor. She labored for some years before her death under an almost uninterrupted bodily indisposition which she bore with that patience, resolution and resignation which became a Christian and her death is an irretrievable loss to her family and justly lamented by her acquaintance."
Given Name: Anne
Death: 25 OCT 1755
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Bond, Thomas (b. 2 MAY 1713, d. 26 MAR 1784)
Note: Dr. Thomas Bond was one of the most distinguished American physicians of the eighteenth century and holds a major place in the history of American medicine. He studied medicine as an apprentice, as was then customary. But, contrary to what is frequently stated, he did not study under Dr. Alexander Hamilton of Annapolis, Maryland's most celebrated doctor of his day. Hamilton was born in 1712, only a year earlier than Bond. Bond probably apprenticed in Philadelphia and finished his studies in Europe, primarily in Paris, beginning in 1738, one of the first American physicians to study abroad.

He moved to Philadelphia probably in 1730 with his half brother, Dr. Samuel Chew (the grandfather of the distinguished jurist Benjamin Chew), and began practicing medicine there about 1734. He opened a shop that year with Samuel Chew on Market Street, selling drugs and other medicinal items. The following year he married his first wife, Susannah Roberts, the daughter of the Mayor of Philadelphia. But he was very soon widowed. Although Bond was born and raised a Quaker, his second wife was an Anglican and he joined that church at the time of his second marriage.

While primarily a physician, he was also a skilled surgeon, performing many amputations and operations for bladder stones, including one on a child of four. His reputation as a surgeon was wide spread and patients came from great distances to avail themselves of his services. Robert Treat Paine came from Boston to be inoculated against smallpox, and Caesar Rodney, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, came from Delaware to have a cancer removed from his face. Bond introduced many innovations in the care of the sick, including a splint, still called a Bond splint, for fractures of the lower arm. Dr. Benjamin Rush ascribed to Bond the first use of mercury for medicinal purposes in this country.

Bond was the driving force behind the founding of the Pennsylvania Hospital, the first hospital in the United States, and his part in the undertaking is extensively discussed in Benjamin Franklin's <i>Autobiography.</i> In his <i>Autobiography</i>, Franklin describes Bond as "a particular friend of mine." Bond was a founder and a member of the board of trustees of the College of Philadelphia, the forerunner of the University of Pennsylvania and helped to found its medical school in 1765, the first medical school in the New World. The following year he delivered the first course of clinical lectures on medicine ever given in what is now the United States. He was also a founder of the school's library, the first medical library in the American colonies.

According to Elizabeth H. Thomson, "his lecture inaugurating clinical instruction . . . has been repeatedly reprinted. Continuing interest in this lecture for nearly 200 years testifies to the soundness of Bond's proposal to teach medicine at the bedside--a method subsequently abandoned, then reinstated a century later, and still a basic principle in medical education."

With his brother Phineas, with whom he shared his practice, and Franklin, he founded the American Philosophical Society in 1743. In 1768, when it was reorganized, he served as its vice president, while Franklin was its president. He acted as its president during the years Franklin was abroad on diplomatic missions. On May 21 1782 he delivered the Society's annual oration, on "The Rank and Dignity of Man in the Scale of Being." He was also a Mason, serving as Deputy Grand Master of St. John's Masonic Lodge under Franklin in 1749 and as Senior Grand Warden of the Pennsylvania Grand Lodge in 1755. He was also a member of the Fishing Company of Fort St. David's.

Dr. Bond lived on Second Street, between Chestnut and Walnut Streets, and kept a carriage to facilitate the making of house calls. He also owned 120 acres in the Northern Liberties of the city, with a small country house. The tax rolls of 1772 reveal that there were seven horses, ten cows, twenty sheep, and two slaves on the place. In 1781, he bought Kinderton, the country place of Rebecca Venables, who seems to have helped raise his wife and who left the Bonds and their children most of her possessions when she died in 1784.

In 1776 he volunteered his services to the Committee of Safety and helped in the organization of the Continental Army. In 1780 he helped found the Humane Society of Philadelphia, the first such society in the United States, and served as its president.

He is buried in the church yard of Christ Church in Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania <i>Gazette </i>of Apr 3 1784 reported that his burial had "such an attendance of his fellow citizens, as was due to the memory of a gentleman, who had gone through life inoffensively to all men; with good humour and kindness to the whole circle of his acquaintance, and with fidelity and affection to his friends." Dr. William Shippen reported that "32 D[octor]s & 22 medical pupils attended the funeral & a vast number of citizens."

By the terms of his will his two slaves were freed upon the death of his wife.

An article on Dr. Thomas Bond appears in the <i>Dictionary of American Biography,</i> the <i>Encyclopedia of American Biography, </i>the <i>American National Biography,</i> and <i>Patriot-Improvers: Biographical Sketches of Members of the American Philosophical Society.</i> There is also an article on him, "Thomas Bond, 1713-1784, First Professor of Clinical Medicine in the American Colonies" by Elizabeth H. Thomson, in the <i>Journal of Medical Education,</i> Vol. 33 (1958), pp. 614-624. A biography of him, by Whitfield J. Bell, Jr., is in preparation.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: DAB
Title: Dictionary of American Biography
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Garraty
Title: John A. Garraty, editor, Encyclopedia of American Biography (New York: H
arper & Row, 1974)
arper & Row, 1974.
Given Name: Thomas
Death: 26 MAR 1784 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Change: Date: 5 Apr 2003

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Roberts, Susannah (b. )
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: DAB
Title: Dictionary of American Biography
Given Name: Susannah
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Sturdivant, Martha (b. )
Given Name: Martha
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Pegram, Edward (b. 13 JAN 1745, d. 30 MAR 1816)
Note: Edward Pegram inherited considerable wealth from his father and lived the life of the Virginia aristocracy. He was said to be six feet six inches tall and large in proportion, which would have made him very large indeed by the standards of the day. He was appointed Special Commander by the colonial government to defend the parish and county against Indian attack, a position that earned him the nickname of "King Pegram." He served as a captain in the Revolutionary War and in the Dinwiddie County Militia. In 1789 he was appointed one of the "Gentlemen Justices" of Dinwiddie County and served as Presiding Justice for a number of years. In 1792-93 he served as Sheriff of the county. He was Mayor of Petersburg in the last years of his life. He was a member of the grand jury that indicted Aaron Burr for treason. The foreman of that jury was John Randolph of Roanoke.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Pegram
Title: Samuel William Simmons, The Pegrams of Virginia and Descendants 1688-19
84 (1985)
84
84. 1985.
Given Name: Edward
Death: 30 MAR 1816 Diamond Spring, Virginia
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Lyle, Mary (b. 1742, d. 30 JUN 1779)
Given Name: Mary
Death: 30 JUN 1779
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Alricks, Harmanus (b. 1710, d. 14 DEC 1772)
Note: Harmanus Alricks was appointed Sheriff of New Castle County in 1731, shortly after the death of his father, but soon moved to Philadelphia after he married his first wife, who had inherited a house on Second Street from her first husband. He sold the house and lot in New Castle that he inherited from his father for two hundred pounds.

When Carlisle, Pennsylvania, was laid out in 1751, he was one of the first settlers, and represented the district in the Pennsylvania Assembly together with General Joseph Armstrong. He served only one term in the Assembly, but held nearly all the local offices, including Prothonotary of Common Pleas, Clerk of Quarter Sessions, Register of the Orphans' Court, Recorder of Deeds, and Justice of Common Pleas for the County of Cumberland. In 1770, he resigned these offices. There are indications that he may have done so for a financial consideration from his successor, something that would not have been regarded as corrupt at the time.

As a public official in a frontier county, Alricks was deeply involved in Indian affairs.

At his death, his personal estate was valued at 870 pounds, including six feather beds with bolsters and pillows, silver tea tongs, a silver cream jug, eighteen silver spoons, a "servant boy's time," and a clock. he was considerably wealthier in real estate. His three lots and houses on High Street in Carlisle were sold for 3,300 pounds and in 1801 part of his Tyrone Township plantation was sold for $1,800. While alive, he had one of the highest tax rates in Carlisle.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: NYGBR
Title: New York Genealogical and Biographical Record
Data:
Text: "Peter Alricks, of the Amsterdam Colony" by George Hannah, July, 1893, pp. 125-132.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Pennsylvania Legislature
Title: Craig W. Horle, et. al., <i>Lawmaking and Legislators in Pennsylvania: A B
iographical Dictionary</i> (Philadelphia, Pa.: University of Pennsylvan
ia Press, 1991)
iographical Dictionary</i>
iographical Dictionary</i>. Philadelphia, Pa.: University of Pennsylvan
ia Press, 1991.
Page: Vol. II, pp. 195-199.
Given Name: Harmanus
Death: 14 DEC 1772 probably Carlisle, Pennsylvania
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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West, Anne (b. 1733, d. 21 NOV 1791)
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: NYGBR
Title: New York Genealogical and Biographical Record
Data:
Text: "Genealogical Notes Relating to Peter Alricks and His Descendants" by Dr. J. G. B. Bulloch and Arthur Adams, July, 1913, pp. 226-233.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Cook
Title: Lewis D. Cook, <i>"Alrichs of New Castle County, Delaware"</i> (TAG)
Page: Vol. 38, pp. 31-39, 90-99.
Given Name: Anne
Death: 21 NOV 1791 Donegal, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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McElderry, Patrick (b. 6 JUL 1755)
Given Name: Patrick
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Clagett, Mary (b. 24 FEB 1771, d. 9 APR 1816)
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Bowie
Title: Effie Gywnn Bowie, Across the years in St. George's County
Given Name: Mary
Death: 9 APR 1816
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Forbes, John (b. 19 MAR 1757, d. 31 DEC 1804)
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Marye
Title: William B. Marye, Chart prepared for Margaret Steele for her applicatio
n to the Colonial Dames
n to the Colonial Dames
n to the Colonial Dames.
Given Name: John
Death: 31 DEC 1804
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Marshall, Elizabeth (b. 1765)
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Marye
Title: William B. Marye, Chart prepared for Margaret Steele for her applicatio
n to the Colonial Dames
n to the Colonial Dames
n to the Colonial Dames.
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Papenfuse
Title: Edward C. Papenfuse, et al, A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland L
egislature, 1635-1789 (Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985)
egislature, 1635-1789
egislature, 1635-1789. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985.
Page: pp. 575-576.
Given Name: Elizabeth
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Rider, John (b. , d. 1689)
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Papenfuse
Title: Edward C. Papenfuse, et al, A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland L
egislature, 1635-1789 (Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985)
egislature, 1635-1789
egislature, 1635-1789. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985.
Given Name: John
Death: 1689 At Sea
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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Hutchins, Anne (b. , d. 1689)
Source: (Individual)
Abbreviation: Papenfuse
Title: Edward C. Papenfuse, et al, A Biographical Dictionary of the Maryland L
egislature, 1635-1789 (Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985)
egislature, 1635-1789
egislature, 1635-1789. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Pr
ess, 1979, 1985.
Page: p. 680.
Given Name: Anne
Death: 1689 At Sea
Change: Date: 9 Feb 2003

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